Eurovision!

I cannot say that I love Eurovision, but I really enjoy watching it when I’m abroad. Somehow, in Poland it’s less entertaining. We (Petra, Lusi, Claire, I and Guillaume, new French volunteer in Rimpar + Nastka and Manu, who commented on the whole thing like professionals) met to watch Eurovision together. It was third weekend in a row with some sort of volunteers’ meeting (after family day in Goldbach and Residenzlauf), which probably explains why we were such a small group.

IMG-20170518-WA0007It was a beautiful day, we enjoyed the sun and the amazing few of the city and the fortress before the show.

The 62. Eurovision Song Contest began on 13th Mai at 9 pm (German time) in Kiev. Almost all of “our” countries were represented, apart from Luxembourg which doesn’t participate since 1993. There were 26 participating countries, among which Germany, France, UK, Spain and Italy have always a guaranteed place in the final. Also the hosting country, in this case Ukraine, automatically joins the final. All other 36 countries take part in half finals to fight for the remaining 20 places. As none of us is a huge fan of Eurovision, we didn’t watch the half finals. Which is why we missed, for example, Lithuanian Little My from The Moomins singing about revolution.

This year’s theme was „Celebrate Diversity“, which I wouldn’t be able to guess if it weren’t written on the logo. The moderators were three white men (there was a short video about their preparations: part of it was getting rid of the Ukrainian accent). This really doesn’t fit my definition of diversity.

In case anyone wonders what is this whole Eurovision:

Horse’s head worn by a dancer on a ladder

Whole choreography on treadmills

Mommy issues with saxophone

Romanian Yodel (it’s better not to ask)

I other words, Eurovision means: a lot of kitsch, a lot of fireworks, not too much sense, sometimes dancing gorillas (and a few boring songs to balance it out).

That is also a very good explanation:

I believe everyone knows, which song won. The winner, Salvator Sobral, sang at the end with his sister Luísa who wrote both the lyrics and the music (and also sings better than him).

This is Salvator during press conference after the half final – he wanted to wear this sweatshirt also in the final koncert, sadly was not allowed to.

If you need more Eurovision, Buzzfeed has you covered 😉

 

 

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